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5 Star Home Inspections | Greenwood Village, CO

Radon FAQ


What is Radon?

Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural breakdown of the Uranium found in soil, rock and water.


Why is Radon a problem?

According to the EPA, Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.


Where is Radon found?

Radon is present everywhere. However, there are parts of the country where concentrations are higher. Colorado is one of the areas of higher concentration. Click here for a map of areas of Radon concentration


If Radon is eveywhere, why should I test my home?

When Radon enters your home it gets trapped. This can cause the Radon concentration in your home to be higher than outside.


How does Radon enter my home?

Because it is a gas, Radon can enter your home through the smallest of openings. Radon typically enters through cracks, holes and spaces in the foundation. As the warm air in your home rises, air (containing Radon) is pulled from the ground to replace it. Once in your home, the Radon is trapped, potentially causing a higher than acceptable concentration.


What factors effect the concentration of Radon in my home?

Factors include: weather, soil porosity, soil moisture and how much air your home pulls from the ground. The most important factor is the amount of Uranium in the soil below your home.


My neighbor's house has a high level of Radon, does that mean my house does too?

The Radon level in your home mainly depends on the soil composition below your home and the suction your home creates. Therefore, Radon levels can vary greatly from house to house.


I don't have a basement, do I still need a Radon test?

All houses have the potential for high levels of Radon. Due to the carcinogenic effects of Radon, the EPA recommends that all houses get tested.


My house is old and doesn't seal up very well, do I still need a Radon test?

All houses have the potential for high levels of Radon. Due to the carcinogenic effects of Radon, the EPA recommends that all houses get tested.